Why Don’t Mice Believe in God?

First you may try to debate the point that mice do believe in God. But, if they did, there would be signs of their worship. I don’t see mice building monuments, fighting holy wars, etc. I’ve never seen one pray, as far as I could tell by human standards. There may be a mouse god, but if the Christian (or any human version of a god) god were real wouldn’t mice also believe, pray and worship. Or, do you think mice don’t have a soul they need to save?

Many people may not care what mice do or do not believe. They are small rodents after all. Pestilence. Laboratory animals and pets spinning wheels for human amusement.

But, of course, mice matter. They are one of god’s creatures. Even as an atheist I still think of mice as one of the little creatures on the planet.

So why don’t mice believe in God? A God, any god?

Don’t they need protection and help? Or are they really just alone on the planet, responsible for their own actions and uncared for and unknown but almost every other creature?

I don’t think mice know there is a god. No one has ever told them god is an option. They just go about their mouse lives, oblivious to all the benefits they could have if they just worshipped god. What has god ever done for a mouse? Could it be such a vicious circle where if god only knew and the mice only knew… they could be so much better off. But, they’ve just never been introduced. Although, god did create the mice, right?

So does god just not care about the mice? In all this time god just let the mice go on, not knowing how much better they could be if they just knew there was a god who would offer them eternal life, shinier souls, angels, heaven and of course… demons, devils and hell.

The poor mice. Maybe all of them are just being shipped straight to hell because they don’t worship or believe in god.

Someone really should do something about this. Save the mice!

Well, I will think more about it all. Right after I check the mouse trap under the kitchen sink.

Vintage Dragon Gargoyle Ring

It looks like a gargoyle dragon to me. I like the face. The body is harder to figure out. I’d use it for an ASCII art dragon but I’d have to put my own spin on it to get the details for everything but the head itself. vintage-antique-jewelry.com

vintage-antique-jewelry.comvintage-antique-jewelry.comRing probably made for a man, but a woman can also wear it. Very strong Antique vintage ring for man or woman. 14k yellow gold, cabochon chrysoprase. Made in China circa 1920-40.

Chinese design. The entire ring is moulded as a dragon on one side that metamorphosizes into a snake on the other side. The heads are on either side of the bezel, which contains a colette-set cabochon chrysoprase, looking like jade and is a deep green color. The dragon and snake are modelled in high relief with marvellous detail such as the bulgy temple-god eyes of the dragon and the tongues of both snake and dragon. Curling tendrils and flaring fire from the mouth of both of these animals. The legs seem to crawl and creep around the shank of the ring and to hold the gem, which is like a huge egg. The shank formed partly by the bodies of the animals.

via – Antique Vintage Chinese Ring Dragon Snake Gold Chrysoprase Man / Woman

 

From Michael MacRae

The short story only adds to the image. I just want to know more. It seems to be post apocalypse, but it could be something else.

“The days are regimented here and though you should expect him to leave me in the tundra if I were to fall behind, you could say I am well fed and energized, so do not worry. All that he provides in the way of foodstuffs is deer meat. I’ve relied on my rations of tin vegetables and and have taken up the hobby of fishing to satisfy a varied diet.
We hunt most hours of the day, he kills the animals leaving me to fix them to sleds and drag the carcasses, sometimes miles at a time back to the cave where he does not permit me to enter. I’ve been used as little more than a pack mule in these trips but from what I understand he brings me along to observe. It is difficult discerning him as he does not speak, or chooses not to, and he refrains from physical conversation beyond simple gestures when it pleases him. He engages in other activities on a mysterious schedule and he seems to make good use of any time I am away or the rare chance I may be caught sleeping. I’ve stepped outside for only minutes and returned to find a fully skinned and gutted carcass splayed upon the table with its spine removed and ground into sludge. He was sitting in his chair.
He acts like a shadow, constantly moving about the walls rather than cross the floor. If I don’t watch him closely it is easy to lose track of him, even in this confined cabin space. During the nights (if one can call them as such, they are little more than dim evenings here) he sits across from the bed, facing the snuffed out fireplace, barely visible in his dark and oiled wraps. Comfortable sleep has become a luxury, on more than one occasion I have awoke to find he had rotated to face me, his gaunt statuesque form with long fingers clutching the ends of the arm rests. I suppose it goes without saying that he does not make for good company.
I have yet to fully understand what we are doing here, I do hope it is revealed soon. As things are though, I may be here for some time.
– M”

afternoon_rituals_by_themichaelmacrae-d9koj5bSource: He Does Not Sleep by TheMichaelMacRae on DeviantArt

A Stick in the Mud for Wind Power

The Vortex bladeless turbine uses the wind to vibrate instead of spin. That makes it cheaper, quieter, and more reliable than a bladed turbine.

Source: This wind turbine has no blades — and that’s why it’s better | Grist

My first question… Does it still create as much energy as the turbines with blades? (It doesn’t).

My next question… What about the birds? I can understand how birds and bats fly into them. The colour is meant to blend into the sky (for human sensibilities, not birds).

As far as noise, we parked right next to one here in Ontario. Turned off the car (the car made more sound than the turbine) and just listened for half an hour. It was very quiet. Out on a backroad, in the middle of nowhere, for awhile we felt apart from all civilization. That feeling of being still after the world has ended.

Without blades the new wind power could be very low maintenance and have far less parts to replace. That’s a good thing.

But, they do produce less energy. The solution offered in the article is to have more of them. Is this practical?

How many can be grouped together before they lose efficiency due to blocking the very wind they rely on? How many land owners are going to want a forest of these on their land? How long will it be before the same people who protested the noise of wind turbines find these have a persistent hum or vibration or some other problem which gives them headaches?

I’m not sure a lot of the complaining about wind turbines is really justified. At least the human complaining.

Bladeless turbines may be less deadly to birds and bats, but we can’t be sure of that.

What will happen with more turbines in the same area of land?

There are no perches for birds. We don’t want to encourage the birds to use them, yet a forest of wind turbines take up space without giving the birds a place to rest.

Of course, the bladeless turbines will also be a colour intended to blend in and not obstruct too much of the view, for humans. Birds may fly into these man made forests and not see what they flew smack into. To a bird a forest of nearly invisible tree stalks without perches or branches waving in the wind to show their location may not work out so well.

Could these ivory towers be made nature friendly at the risk of becoming less tolerated by humans who enjoy the energy produced by them? Could bird houses, bee hives and bat boxes be included? Could they be made mandatory? Would that be unsightly or just unnatural?