The Abandoned Art Movement

PrintAlthough Michael and Andrea deMeng started the Art Abandonment movement in June of 2012, publicly leaving art for others is not a new concept. Several decades ago there was a movement called “Guerilla Art, ” which inspired the deMengs’ art abandonment movement.

History of “Guerrilla” Art

Guerrilla art–or street art–originated in the 1980s.

It consisted of graffiti, street sculpture, murals, wall mosaics, and various other forms of artistic expression. Artists would create the art pieces and leave them in public spaces for others to enjoy.
The reasons for street art varied. Often the artists wanted to make a political statement. Sometimes they wanted to get their work out into the world, and bypass the constraints subjected to them by the rules of the formal art world. At other times, they wanted “ordinary” people to have access to art that they normally would never have the chance to encounter. Finally, sometimes they did it just for the fun of it!

Want to Participate in the Art Abandonment Movement?

If you are interested in becoming part of this movement, you will find that there are just a few rules to follow.  To join in, Michael deMeng makes these simple suggestions. All you have to do is the following:

  1. Make a small piece of art.
  2. Put a tag on it stating that you are leaving the art as a free gift to whoever finds it. Make sure to include your desired contact information.
  3. Discreetly leave the art in a public space.
  4. Take a picture of the space you are leaving it in.
  5. Hope that the person who finds the gift responds either by email or replies on the Art Abandonment Facebook page.

Toleware

Toleware (from Wikipedia)

In the collectibles and antique industry, toleware refers to kitchen-related objects created from metal, typically tin or thin steel, and are often in decorative styles such as Arts and Crafts and Pennsylvania Dutch. Decorative painting on these items is common but not necessary. This style of decorative art spread from Europe (where it was referred to as Japanning) to the United States in the 18th century, and was popular in US kitchens in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The term is derived from the French name for tole painting, tôle peinte.

tolewareImage via Everyday Beauty: A Tole Tale.

The Changling Test

Your result for Which Changeling Are You?…

The Courtless

My mother killed her little son,

My father smiled when I was gone,

My sister loved me best of all;

She buried the family one and all.

Once there was a girl, who had no father or mother. All alone in a shack at the end of the village dwelt her godmother, a wicked and cruel woman, yet with just an ounce of heart. This woman wasn’t really a woman, but a disturbed Fae who made her keep amongst the living by spinning, weaving and sewing. The old woman took the miserable child in and put her to work on the loom.

So the years went by and the child eventually mastered the spindle, with it she drew fine lines of thread strong as wire. You had to get it right; else old mother Fay would cut off a finger as a lesson. The girl lost many fingers, but her thread was powerful and she fashioned replacements soon enough.

Eventually she also mastered the shuttle even when her fingers were slick with blood. She had to get it right; else old mother Fay would rip her hair out and make her weave a tapestry from it. Many tapestries later, the girl mastered both arts, and fashioned herself the most beautiful head of hair.

Eventually, she mastered the needle, and hardly noticed when she stitched through her finger tips. You had to get it right, or the old mother Fay would leave you with open seams. Many stitches and many cuts later, the pincushion girl was the most beautiful in the land and also the cleverest.

But she didn’t remain a docile creature, and she was slowly becoming her own master. One day, she would need to be rid of the old tyrant of a creature. The old mother Fay had taken to sleeping at all hours of the day, but try as she may the maiden couldn’t bring herself to challenge her.

One day as she was spinning, the solution came to her.

“Spindle, my spindle, haste thee away,

And here to my house bring the woodsman I pray.”

The spindle sprang out of her hand, out the door and she saw it dancing merrily in the country, drawing a golden thread behind it. Before long it vanished from sight so she took the weaver’s shuttle in her hand, sat down to her loom and began to weave. Soon she began singing another song.

“Shuttle, my shuttle, weave well this day,

And guide the woodsman to me, I pray.”

Immediately the shuttle sprang away and out the door. Before the threshold, it began to weave a tapestry which was more beautiful than the eyes of man had ever yet beheld. Lilies and roses blossomed on both sides and on the golden ground in the centre, green branches ascended, where all kinds of creatures frolicked. In the leaves, brightly colored birds sat, lacking nothing but song. As she held the needle in hand, she sang another song.

“Needle, my needle, sharp-pointed and fine,

Prepare a crime to anger this woodsman of mine.”

The needle leapt out of her fingers and flew everywhere quick as lightning. It threw down the flowers, it turned over the pots, the windows were broken and the door was knocked open. The maiden took herself and began to unstitch the seams that held her together. Very timely were her arts for the woodsman gasped in awe outside, but in dismay when he entered the threshold.

“Who has done this to thee!” She pointed a severed limb at the door to the cellar where the treacherous lazy mother Fay slept.

Old mother Fay, was quite surprised when an axe split her head from her shoulders.

Courtless are a mixture of this and that. They were isolated from the other changelings, so they had to improvise and find what worked for them. Many were abandoned and many more had no choice in their time in the realm of Faerie. They learned incomplete lessons in Pride, Avarice, Wrath and Desire, as such their body reflects this. Many are as incomplete or replaced with parts not entirely human or fae.

le=”font-size:9pt;font-family:’Comic Sans MS’;”>Courtless are like mannequin or dolls, covered in stitches. This is alright as each line or scar is a reminder for what happened and how they fixed that problem.

 

They found it difficult to escape the lands of the Fae because they didn’t know better. They thought the realm of Fae was all there was. To escape they had to dream of normalcy, they had to dream of something besides sick humor and pain. They had to overcome what they thought was their lives, dream of something better. As such, they were born into the impossible; which is why, coming to reality was possible.

 

Look back on the tale of the wooden boy – who only wanted to be real. He knew no better, he knew not what was evil and not what was good. He was a fool, but a lucky and crafty fool. He knows better now.

Beasts | Darklings | Elementals | Fairest | Ogres | Wizened

Take Which Changeling Are You? at HelloQuizzy

Link Love Tag

Lady Banana tagged me with this Link Love!

Start Copying Here

I have randomly selected 5 of you below to be tagged and I hope that you will similarly publish this post in your blog. You will have to tag 5 other bloggers and just keep adding on to the list. (Do not replace, just keep on adding! Yes we hope it will be a long list!)

It’s real easy! Tag others and see your Technorati Authority increase exponentially! The benefits of Viral Linking:- One of the fastest ways to see your Technorati authority explode!- Increase your Google PageRank fast- Attract large volume of new traffic to your site- Build your community- Make new friends!

The Strategist Notebook ~ Link Addiction ~ Ardour of the Heart ~ When Life Becomes a Book ~ The Malaysian Life ~ Yogatta.com ~ What goes under the sun ~ Roshidan’s Cyber Station ~ Sasha says ~ Arts of Physics ~ And the legend lives ~ My View, My Life ~ A Simple Life ~ Juliana RW ~ Mom Knows Everything ~ Beth & Cory’s Mom ~ A Mind Forever Voyaging~ enjoying the ride ~ Jennifer’s thoughts ~ Mom of 3 Girls ~ Amanda ~ Don’t Make Me Get The Flying Monkeys ~ ExPat Mom ~ Just Jessie ~ Wilson Six ~Krisitn ~ Nuttier Than You ~ Shonnte ~ Summer’s Nook ~ Laura Williams Musings ~ Sher ~ Shanda ~ Seven QTPies ~ Mel ~ Skittles ~ Lady BananaThat Grrl

Stop Copying

I now tag:
LatteGirl
Lucy
Reality is Over Rated
Lunatic Fringe
Anti Barbie

Time Travels


If you had a time machine and could go back to any place or time period, where would you go? Or, would you go?

Assuming we could always have a look at the future later, I would like to go far back and see women through the ages. Those first women who lived in caves and (so they say) had a tendency to be dragged around by their hair. I’d like to see how the ancient women really lived, what their life was like. Of course it was far shorter than our standards today. I bet they looked a lot different. Not even counting the neanderthal-ness. There were no doctors, bandages, not so much as a splint or needle and thread to sew them up in case of accident. If they got broken they pretty much stayed that way, if they survived. I don’t imagine cave women were all too concerned about hygene either.

Somewhere in time women were matriarches in their socities, tribes, families. I’d like to see that too. How did it all work out? How were the relationships between men and women then. How did families work together. How was the tribe governed and was it so much more peaceful, as we are told by some historians.

If the Amazons were real, as I tend to think they were, I’d like to see them too. Really see who they were and how they lived as opposed to the usual fiction and assumed facts. I don’t believe that stuff about them cutting off one breast in order to use their bows and arrows better. I don’t believe they killed off any male children or fed them to wild animals or just left them to be found by other tribes. Women, in general, are not the ones to abandon or hurt other people.

Then I’d like to see the Witches. Not those poor women burned at stakes and tortured to confess to dancing naked with the devil and so on. I would like to see the women who taught themselves about the herbs, how they best grow and are found, how to harvest them at the right time of year and day/ evening, how they should be used to help people. Not for spell casting, but for healing and helping. Those women (and likely some men too) really had knowledge which is lost now. Like the masons, blacksmiths and other skilled people from so long ago, so much of those old arts and crafts have been lost. They couldn’t (or chose not to) write it all down. Keeping information accurately from person to person doesn’t work very well. Things are lost, scrambled or kept secret intentionally.

Then I could skip some time. Although I like the fashions and jewels of the ages between the wise women and the pioneer women, I don’t really have a lot of interest in seeing it. Likely it all looks (and smells) better seeing them in movies, books and so on.

So, skip ahead to those pioneer women who came from so far to so near, now. I’d like to see those women who came over as brides of the king, I forget the French term for it now. I used to know, even wrote about them. They had a lot to adjust to, coming from all kinds of lives (not always country girls who were used to working so hard on a farm). I’d like to see all the work they did to break ground in a new land. I’d like to have a real appreciation for all they did, the fears and loneliness they experienced and all they learned as they became the pioneer women we see in movies these days.

Overall, I’d like to meet women who did things in the arts too. Women who sewed, painted, gardened and so many other things which may be unknown now. I think women did far more in the past than we do now. In spite of how advanced and modern we think we are.

Anyway, what would you go back to see? Is there anyone in particular you’d like to meet?