Why Don’t Mice Believe in God?

First you may try to debate the point that mice do believe in God. But, if they did, there would be signs of their worship. I don’t see mice building monuments, fighting holy wars, etc. I’ve never seen one pray, as far as I could tell by human standards. There may be a mouse god, but if the Christian (or any human version of a god) god were real wouldn’t mice also believe, pray and worship. Or, do you think mice don’t have a soul they need to save?

Many people may not care what mice do or do not believe. They are small rodents after all. Pestilence. Laboratory animals and pets spinning wheels for human amusement.

But, of course, mice matter. They are one of god’s creatures. Even as an atheist I still think of mice as one of the little creatures on the planet.

So why don’t mice believe in God? A God, any god?

Don’t they need protection and help? Or are they really just alone on the planet, responsible for their own actions and uncared for and unknown but almost every other creature?

I don’t think mice know there is a god. No one has ever told them god is an option. They just go about their mouse lives, oblivious to all the benefits they could have if they just worshipped god. What has god ever done for a mouse? Could it be such a vicious circle where if god only knew and the mice only knew… they could be so much better off. But, they’ve just never been introduced. Although, god did create the mice, right?

So does god just not care about the mice? In all this time god just let the mice go on, not knowing how much better they could be if they just knew there was a god who would offer them eternal life, shinier souls, angels, heaven and of course… demons, devils and hell.

The poor mice. Maybe all of them are just being shipped straight to hell because they don’t worship or believe in god.

Someone really should do something about this. Save the mice!

Well, I will think more about it all. Right after I check the mouse trap under the kitchen sink.

Tapestries: An Exploration of World Maps

Reprinted from an article directory. I couldn’t resist posting information about maps in history.

Article by: Angela Dawson-Field

People have always been curious about the world around them and the development of maps has echoed this historical fascination. Maps were once considered to be valuable objects and were treasured by their owners and regarded as works of art in their own right. These objects attracted the attention of artists as well as skilled draughtsmen and maps became quite ornate and decorative items, capturing the imagination of those who wondered what lay beyond the horizon.

Early maps tended to reflect what people knew or remembered and were largely topographical in nature. Often, these early pieces depicted myth and lore, combining to create “living maps” that were passed form generation to generation. Formalising the topography into early maps, knowledge became standardised and sowed the foundation of early cartography.

By the Middle Ages cartography had slowed in that accuracy became replaced by religious depiction through maps. Examples of strong belief can be seen in some maps where the Holy Land is shown to be at the centre of the earth. Another example is Europa Regina by Johannes Bucius which shows an early and elongated map, depicting Europe as the Queen of the World.

The Age of Seafaring during the 16th and 17th centuries saw new interest in map making, particularly the British and the Dutch taking to the seas and exploring new lands. At this time maps became increasingly artistic. An East Indies map in tropical colouring with pineapple trees and other exotic flora and fauna, designed to capture the imagination and evoke the scent of spice in the air is a typical example. As the demand for cartographers grew in the 17th century the artistic nature of maps from a purely functional item to a work of art began to evolve.

Maps were often decorated elaborately with sea creatures or mythical characters. Many of these very accomplished draughtsmen created quite unique works of art from map making. Maps designed by Petrus Plancius (1552-1622) or Abraham Ortelius (1528-1598) were frequently found embellished with intricate pictorial content. A successor to Abraham Ortelius was the Dutch cartographer Jan Baptist Vrients (1552-1612) who designed Obis Terrae Compendosia. The world is split into two hemispheres and surrounded by ornate and detailed pictorial decoration. The map brings a perception of how the world looks and a plethora of exotic creatures and landscapes from the far flung shores of the globe.

Another famous example is Nova Totius Terrarum, designed by Henricus Hondius (1597-1622), a Dutch Cartographer. This 17th century map is an ornate depiction of the world and is surrounded by detailed nautical scenes, perhaps reflecting the age and drama of exploration by sea as mythical creatures rise from the ocean and men are seen contemplating their journey.

Antique maps are increasingly popular in the modern home and make elaborate tapestries in home décor. There are a number of ways in which an antique map can add charm and elegance to the home, whether in poster, print or tapestry format and are much appreciated by connoisseurs of good taste.

Copyright © The Tapestry House, all rights reserved.

About the Author: Angela Dawson-Field writes extensively on home
decor and tapestry & textile art. The Tapestry House
http://www.thetapestryhouse.com/products/index.html
http://www.thetapestryhouse.com/

Source: Reprint this free article (318215) by Angela Dawson-Field at Isnare.com Free Articles Directory

Dragons Could Exist

5 Mythical Creatures That Could Exist – Weird Worm.

If it is possible that the Loch Ness Monster may have been one of the last remaining members of an extinct species then the same could be true for the dragon. How else could one explain the remarkable similarity between ancient depictions of dragons and some long-extinct dinosaurs? Well actually, the widely recognized medieval image of the dragon may have evolved from the original serpentine dragon after dinosaur remains were accidentally uncovered in classical Mesopotamia. In ancient Greece, Rome and the Celtic world dragon iconography was much more like that of China. Europe did not convert to the modern, metric dragon until much later on.

But does this alteration of dragon iconography help us determine the origin of the myth? Not really. The dragon, albeit in a more serpentine form, features in the folklore of almost every culture around the world and is synonymous with power, strength, wisdom and often brutality. The ancient civilizations of Central America even worshiped flying serpent gods, going so far as to make blood sacrifices in their honour. The serpent cults of Eastern Europe and Central Asia may once have done the same for their own dragon icons too. Clearly this reptilian obsession is as old as mankind itself.

But does this mean that dragons are nothing more than a distant memory from our primordial past? The people of medieval Europe and Asia clearly thought otherwise. To them dragons were everywhere, hiding in the cave down the road, burning down churches and eating their children. It was believed that the far off lands of the East were abound with the fire breathing brutes.

Are we to take these stories literally? Many scholars believe that dragons are nothing but a metaphor for evil and pagan ritual, but while this may be true of some Christian folklore there is much evidence to suggest that the monsters these people were so afraid of were not merely ideological in nature.

In the Far East, of course, dragons have entirely different connotations. There they are considered to be creatures of great wisdom and spirituality. They are associated with the elements of water and air, rather than fire. The gods are said to have descended from the sky inside the belly of a dragon. Legend has it that Emperor Huang Ti also ascended to the stars aboard a dragon drawn chariot. This, says UFOlogist Hartwig Hausdorf, is evidence that dragons were not living creatures at all, rather some kind of alien spacecraft.

Weird, Unexplained and Paranormal Ontario

Paranormal OntarioI began following accounts of the paranormal as a kid, living in small town Ontario. I have never forgotten some of the unexplained mysteries I read then. One, in particular, about a girl in the school yard who is suddenly scooped up into the air and then thrown down. No one could find a reason or a method for this to happen. But, it did happen.

There are many paranormal explorers and researchers in Ontario. Many focus on the ghosts and haunted places. But, there is so much more out there, ghosts seem small in comparison.

One of my favourite paranormal studies are the creatures, like the lake monsters. It doesn’t seem so unreasonable to me that they could be real animals, seldom seen and not at all understood.

Paranormal also includes UFOs and space aliens.

I’d like to find more paranormal groups which don’t have the heavy focus on ghosts, hauntings and that area. I think it’s something that will never be 100% proved because there are so many brilliant fakes and so many ways to mislead yourself or find a perfectly sensible sounding explanation.

Ontario Paranormal Groups, Investigators and Societies

Primeval: Science Fiction with Dinosaurs

primevalPrimeval is a science fiction TV show featuring dinosaurs and other prehistoric reptiles, mammals, insects, etc. who wander into the modern world by way of anomalies.

Nick Cutter, professor of Palaeontology and evolutionary zoologist, and his team track down the anomalies try to control the prehistoric creatures while believing there is all something bigger to it.

The team includes: Stephen, Cutter’s lab technician, Connor, an uber-geek palaeontology student and Abby, a zoo keeper.

The Research, the Anomalies and the Apocalypse

Cutter starts out researching how some prehistoric creatures appear, disappear and then reappear at different time periods. His wife, Helen, is also a scientist in the same field but, Helen has been missing 8 years and is presumed dead. Only she isn’t dead at all.

As it turns out Helen has found some part of the answer to Nick Cutter’s research. But, her point of view is different. They believe the prehistoric creatures aren’t all from our past, some of them could be our future. They think humans are headed for their own extinction and will become some of these creatures in a future time. Helen and Nick both take different slants on how to solve or fix the problem which seems to be caused by these anomalies.

Big Trouble in Modern History

By the end of the second season Stephen has been eaten by prehistoric creatures. Being the security type of guy on the team is hard work. The next security guy is another tall, dark and handsome lad, Captain Becker who has survived so far.

By the end of the third season Nick Cutter himself is deceased. Helen, his dead again wife, is killed by a raptor dinosaur in the next season.

Sarah Page was a good character who joined in season 3 but didn’t come back for season 4. They say she was killed during an attempted rescue mission, trying to find Abby and Connor. Sarah Page became a favourite character when she travelled back in time to help a knight and a dinosaur who looked like a dragon. I was sorry her character wasn’t there when Primeval got picked up for season 4 and 5.

This TV show has a way of losing main characters, getting temporarily cancelled and yet still coming back with an interesting story and a continuing theme of fixing those anomalies. As of yet, they are not fixed.

My Primeval Favourites

The characters of Abby and Connor have a quiet romance. At one point Connor confesses his love while holding Abby’s hand (keeping her from falling over the edge of a steep drop). Later he can’t admit he said it and they both let things slide. In later episodes they end a season by having Connor and Abby lost in the time of the dinosaurs, together and unable to get home. Of course, they do get home at the start of the next season.

Even though on and off romances tend to ruin most shows for me, I can’t help liking the characters of Connor and Abby as they continue on in their mixed up, quiet romance.

The other character I really enjoy, who has stuck through every season of the show, is James Lester. He’s the real stiff upper lip type with a heart of gold. No matter what he is always behind the team, even when he pretends not to care. He isn’t the typical leading man and yet he does have many of the usual qualifications in an offkey kind of way. Still, James Lester is the character I like most of all.

The Future for Primeval?

I looked and looked online but there is no hope for a new season for Primeval UK. I didn’t read a true, definite ‘never’, but it looks like it will be a good long wait before we see a return of the UK Primeval crew.

Primeval New WorldPrimeval: New World, filmed in Vancouver, BC, Canada had one season before being cancelled.  I’ve seen fans protesting, trying the petition route. But, I have a feeling it won’t get a second chance. As a fan of Primeval, I liked seeing the story continue and a couple of the UK characters put in appearances. Actors from Eureka got another science fiction TV show too. But, it was very US-ian. Watching the show I forgot it was Canadian made at all. In that way it was disappointing. I’d still watch if it were back on. I watched every episode of the first season because I wanted to see where they would take the story. So, I would like to see it get more time.

Links to More about the Primeval TV Show

Primeval: New World (The New Version)

Primeval Primeval Primeval Primeval