My Favourite Teacups

Gorgeous teacupsThese shiny gold/ orange firey teacups are my favourites. My Mother and I collect them. We have three full sets (cup and saucer) with this pattern. One is more worn and always makes me feel a little sad. Poor old thing.

This photograph comes from a set for sale on Etsy. I love the photo. It’s hard to take a photo of the glow from the finish/ glaze on the teacups.

We only use these cups and saucers about once a year. Other than that they are kept on a shelf which has a glass door so we can see them. Unlike silver they don’t tarnish so you can leave them out to be seen without having to worry about it. (Silver tarnishes faster when it is exposed to air and sunlight). I guess these cups would eventually fade if they were in full sun, but they are safe in their little corner of the kitchen.

It’s nice having a few special things. I think we tend to gather and collect and keep too much nowadays, myself included. I have far more non-fiction books than I will ever read (unless I discover immortality – even then I’d have to not age while I’m busy being immortal).

Are you Fiction or Non-Fiction?


You Are Fiction


You believe that life is magical, especially when you enter the world of ideas.

You are highly creative and imaginative. The real world often isn’t enough for you.You are optimistic and hopeful. You believe that we craft our own destinies.

You believe that if you can dream it, you can do it. And you do a lot of dreaming.

Survivors

I’m watching Survivors again. Based on a book by Terry Nation (which I can’t find at Chapters). The author is deceased, awhile ago. Was sad to read that. He is also known for creating the Daleks in Doctor Who.

From Wikipedia: Survivors is a British television series devised by Terry Nation and produced by Terence Dudley at the BBC from 1975 to 1977. It concerns the plight of a group of people who have survived an accidentally released plague that kills nearly the entire population of the planet. The programme is usually described as falling into the science fiction genre, and fits into the sub-genre of apocalyptic fiction. It was remade in 2008.

Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction, from Wikipedia. I still think of it as armageddon, but that’s from playing Carmageddon until it merged with my brain cells.

Apocalyptic fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of civilization either through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. Post-apocalyptic fiction is set in a world or civilization after such a disaster. The time frame may be immediately after the catastrophe, focusing on the travails or psychology of survivors, or considerably later, often including the theme that the existence of pre-catastrophe civilization has been forgotten (or mythologized). Post-apocalyptic stories often take place in an agrarian, non-technological future world, or a world where only scattered elements of technology remain. There is a considerable degree of blurring between this form of science fiction and that which deals with false utopias or dystopic societies.
The genres gained in popularity after World War II, when the possibility of global annihilation by nuclear weapons entered the public consciousness. However, recognizable apocalyptic novels existed at least since the first quarter of the 19th century, when Mary Shelley’s The Last Man was published. Additionally, the subgenres draw on a body of apocalyptic literature, tropes, and interpretations that are millennia old.