Nice Kitchen in a Tower

kitchen

Grade I listed Hadlow Tower near Tonbridge, Kent, was commissioned by wealthy businessman Walter May in 1838 because he suspected his wife was sleeping with a local farmer.

Source: Kent’s Hadlow Tower where 19th-century businessman locked up cheating wife goes on sale | Daily Mail Online

The tower and the story were interesting to read about. But, it was this space – the kitchen furniture and set up which I especially like.

Chocolate Caramel Cheesecake

The white chocolate chips are really nice as polka dots on this cake.Chocolate Caramel Cheesecake

Serves 8 to 10

1 crumb crust (recipe below)

1 cup sugar

3/4 cup heavy cream

8 oz fine-quality bittersweet chocolate (not unsweetened), chopped

1/2 cup sour cream

3 (8 ounce) packages cream cheese, softened

4 large eggs1 teaspoon vanilla

Source: chocolate caramel cheesecake | smitten kitchen

Kitchen in a Cupboard

This is perfect. You can cook stove top, it has two “induction hobs”, I looked it up, and its a type of stove top, uses less energy, and the heat goes to the pot, not the surface.  To me that sounds great. And you can replace the microwave with a combo microwave/convection oven.  And toaster ovens are the best thing ever invented, honest try one – can bake small batch’s of cookies, bisquits – many things. And as for the fridge being too small, I have one this size, and its enough for me, as I shop daily for most things.

Curated from Curbly

cupboard1 cupboard2

Original source: Culshawbell

Duck Fat Dinner Rolls for Thanksgiving

Duck Fat Dinner Rolls
Adapted from Donald Link’s Real Cajun, by way of Amateur Gourmet

1 package (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
1/2 cup lukewarm water

1/2 cup shortening or lard
1/3 cup sugar
1 tablespoon salt
1/2 cup boiling water

1 egg, lightly beaten
3 1/2 to 4 cups all-purpose flour
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, melted

In a small bowl, stir together the yeast and warm water. Set aside.
In a large mixing bowl, use a fork to combine the shortening, sugar, salt, and boiling water. Allow this mixture to cool for a few minutes. (Alternatively, you can combine the ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer. Beat for 2 minutes using the paddle attachment until combined, then cool.)

Use a fork to stir the beaten egg and yeast into the shortening mixture, then add 3 cups of the flour (add the remaining 1/2 to 1 cup as you knead). When the mixture pulls together into a dough and you can no longer stir it with a fork, use your hands.
Lightly flour a work surface and knead the dough until it has a smooth sheen and doesn’t fall apart; 5 to 10 minutes. Try not too add too much flour here.

Cover the dough and let it rise for 30-40 minutes, until it has increased 25%. Punch it down, knead it briefly (up to 1 minute).
Roll the dough into 2-inch balls (there should be enough dough for about 16 rolls), and space evenly on a butter baking sheet.
Cover and let rise for 15 minutes. Heat the oven to 325F.

Bake the rolls for about 20 minutes, until golden brown.
Brush with copious amounts of melted butter. Eat hot.

via Duck fat dinner rolls | heartful mouthful.

Halfway through the recipe to make these for Thanksgiving tomorrow. Could have doubled it but I’m just too tired (and the kitchen is over warm for the bread making – too warm for me) and don’t have the energy for all that more kneading. Will see how they turn out. The duck fat was interesting to work with. Right now they are having the first rising time and I am starting the cheesecake recipe.