Bio-Cremation

I’d prefer this method if I had to be cremated. But, at this point in my life I’d actually like to have a living wake (a funeral type of get together while I’m still alive) and have my body tossed into a hole in the ground, as is. Or just throw it into the deep ocean. Having a gravestone is a huge expense and not usually welcome in cemeteries these days. So, I’d rather have no stone at all if I can’t have some grandly romantic and mysterious sculptured gravemarker.

Likely, bio-cremation is the closest I will get to what I’d plan for myself. But, once I’m dead it really is up to whoever has to dispose of my body at that time. We (or I at least) don’t know how or where we are going to end up (literally end).

Bio-cremation is the funeral industry–approved term for alkaline hydrolysis, a method of corpse disposal in which lye and water are heated under pressure, dissolving flesh and leaving only bone fragments and whatever surgical oddments the body contained. The process is often faster than traditional cremation and costs about the same, and the end product takes up less space than a standard burial. Bio-­cremation’s unique selling point, however, is its environmental friendliness. It consumes one-eighth the energy of cremation, requires no casket, and leaches no toxic embalming fluids into the earth. Yet it is still a niche practice, even in a country as green-savvy as ours: Hilton’s facility is one of just three in Canada.

Source: Dissolving the Dead · thewalrus.ca

A Bookmark You Wouldn't Want to Lose

I found this photo on SheExists. I love the idea for a bookmark like this, elegant, feminine and romantic. The quote below came from the same site, a different post.

We spend January 1 walking through our lives, room by room, drawing up a list of work to be done, cracks to be patched. Maybe this year, to balance the list, we ought to walk through the rooms of our lives… not looking for flaws, but for potential. – Ellen Goodman