Cutting Canadians for Syrian Refugees

Maybe we can just have a lottery and decide whether we want to look after Canadian homeless families or Syrian homeless families. The loser gets to live on the streets of Toronto. Oh wait… they already are.

By Randall Palmer and Julia Edwards OTTAWA/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Canada’s government will inevitably have to cut some corners on security screening to achieve its ambitious goal of bringing in 25,000 Syrian refugees by year-end, said current and former security sources. The plan by newly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau seeks to complete in six weeks a process that can take up to two years in the United States, where last Friday’s attacks in Paris have sparked a political backlash against plans to allow in 10,000 Syrians over the coming year. In Canada, which shares about 5,500 miles (8,850 km) of relatively porous border with the United States, Friday’s attacks have prompted calls for Trudeau to push back the Jan. 1 deadline to ensure all the refugees are properly screened.

Source: Canada may have to cut corners to meet Syrian refugees target – Yahoo News Canada

What Makes America the Greatest Country in the World?

theusakingQ&A: “What Makes America the Greatest Country in the World?”.

America is not a country. It’s a landmass made up of two continents: North America and South America. Here, let me describe them…

(Link to the full post is above).

This is my comment:

Thank you for your post! We talk about the same idea, how America and American could mean anyone from North or South America. Why don’t people in the US have their own name for their people? Sometimes we call them USers or USians, but they really should have a better name. I don’t know of any other country which does not have a word or phrase for it’s citizens. It’s kind of weird really.

If we talk to people from the US about this they get all huffy about it. “Americans are Americans!”. But, in fact, Americans could be Mexican or Canadian or Chilean, etc. USians are a people without a name of their own.

Even “United States” or “United States of America” is non-descriptive.  There are other countries with the same name, more or less.

Anyway, I thought it was just a few of us up here in Canada who thought about this at all. Nice to see someone else has noticed.

Gun Training in Canadian Schools?

As a Canadian the customs of the United States sometimes seem to lack perspective. As if everything is slightly skewed in the wrong direction and values are more for money and fame than life and living. Guns are a big deal in Canada, but for most Canadians it is about not having them or using them. Gun control in Canada is fairly welcome while in the US it is still a big issue.

It isn’t that Canadians don’t hunt or protect themselves. However, I have lived in Canada all but a couple of years of my life and have only ever held and then fired a gun once and that was during time spent in the US, not in Canada at all. I have seen the odd gun (outside of TV shows/ movies). I never thought to take a look at any of them. It was only in the US where I was invited to fire a gun and that was not while hunting for anything but during a holiday where guns were fired randomly, for entertainment.
gun training and control
This was posted to Facebook and though it was meant for the US people, it did not specify them solely, so I answered it. Usually I would read it and think of a reply but not post it. I leave the US people to their own thing, especially when it comes to something about guns and other issues which are so different in Canada versus the US. It is better to disagree in silence. Today I left a post, maybe it will give them another angle to think about. Likely not. But, this time I posted anyway.

I went to elementary school in the 1970s. We never had any kind of weapon training or safety training for weapons, not in high school, college or university either. The only time in my life I have ever touched a gun (other than a water pistol) was when I lived in the United States.

Toleware

Toleware (from Wikipedia)

In the collectibles and antique industry, toleware refers to kitchen-related objects created from metal, typically tin or thin steel, and are often in decorative styles such as Arts and Crafts and Pennsylvania Dutch. Decorative painting on these items is common but not necessary. This style of decorative art spread from Europe (where it was referred to as Japanning) to the United States in the 18th century, and was popular in US kitchens in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The term is derived from the French name for tole painting, tôle peinte.

tolewareImage via Everyday Beauty: A Tole Tale.

Most Lakes and Education

This was nice to read about Canada especially.

25 Things You Wouldn’t Believe About These Countries
Depending upon your definition, and whether or not you count Taiwan, there are “approximately” 196 countries in the world as of this writing. So while you may consider yourself to be a knowledgeable global citizen, and we’re sure you are, given the dynamic and complex nature of our planet there are certain to be at least a couple facts on this list that you will find surprising. Here are 25 things that you wouldn’t believe about these countries.