The Polka Dot Door

the polka dot doorDo you remember The Polka Dot Door?

The Polka Dot Door was a children’s television show which began in the 1970′s in Ontario, Canada. TV Ontario broadcast the program 1971 to 1993.

Songs and stories and so much more at the Polka Dot Door!

Every show had a man and a woman as hosts and Polkaroo, a life sized polka dotted kangaroo, would appear for a few minutes on almost every show. They played in a play house which had a polka dot door, of course. Educational videos would be shown through one of the polka dots on the door.

The house also included a large indoor space where the hosts would have tea parties and birthdays and everything else. Outdoors I remember the playground with a sandbox and swing set.

I liked the toys: Marigold (a doll), Bear, (a stuffed teddy bear) and Humpty and Dumpty (two stuffed characters with round egg-like bodies) as if they were real but could only talk to the hosts. Often the host would pause, say “What was that Marigold?”, or “Bear says he…” and so on. Usually they would pick up the toy as they carried on a short conversation between the toy, themselves and the children watching the show.

Each show had a theme which would fit into the day of the week:

  • Monday was Treasure Day
  • Tuesday was Dress-Up Day
  • Wednesday was Animal Day
  • Thursday was Imagination Day
  • Friday was Finding-Out Day

Tanya Petrova, a Canadian soft sculpture artist, created Polkaroo.

Later Polka Dot Shorts began as a spin off from the original show. This show featured the toys as life sized soft sculptures having educational adventures.

Marigold the doll

Marigold was my favourite. I tried to find a sewing pattern to make the Marigold doll but did not find anything.  I did find this photo which shows more of her design so I could make a pattern myself.

The Grass On the Other Side was Greener

Being Green (reprinted from Facebook)

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or
future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled.
But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.

But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart ass young person.

Red Green’s Guide to Women (for Men)

The real joke behind Red Green’s book about understanding women is that Steve Smith (the author) has been with his wife, Morag Smith, for over 45 years. Her 16th birthday was their first date. Now, over the age of retirement, they are still together.

During the TV show, “The Red Green Show” Red would mention his wife, naming her Bernice, but no wife ever appeared on the show. At the close of each show he would tell Bernice he was coming home after the meeting (with the Possum Lodge members). Usually something was added about what he wanted, or hoped for, once he would get home. It would always depend on the show that week. The routine of the show was to end showing a group of men, facing away from the camera and giving the “Man’s Prayer”.

This book is based on humour, not meant as completely serious advice, but everything written here comes from a man who will be celebrating 50 years with the same woman in the near future. Funny, but this comic relief is the voice of experience.

Steve Smith began the character of Red Green and later the Possum Lodge for a comedy troupe known as “Smith & Smith” based in Hamilton, Ontario. The troupe included his wife and a few other friends, both actors and comedians. “Smith & Smith” ended sometime in the 1980’s. “The Red Green Show” lasted 15 seasons, closing in 2006 so Steve Smith could ‘retire’. Not that he actually retired. Although the TV show ended the books, tours and TV appearances have continued.

Red Green on Facebook.

Red Green on Twitter.  #redgreenlovetips

Writing About Obesity

Update: Again, About.com did not pick me. Another declination (that should be a word) from About.com. I’d be discouraged except every writer is supposed to have rejections and when you write for your own sites you lack that sense of rejection. So I have to rely on these random applications to About.com for my rejection slips. So… thank you About.com.

I applied for the Obesity topic at About.com today. I spent most of the day getting distracted, writing about why I want to write about Obesity for About.com, deciding which links to send them and adjusting/ adapting my web resume to send. On the resume I just took out some extras.

This is what I sent about why I want to write:

I am a fat woman, have been large sized for most of my life. I would like to give other large women the chance to live (not taking a back seat in their own life) as they are, yet be aware of health risks. To find their way through the current trend to accept fat and the other side saying accepting being fat is a bad thing. I see a middle ground.

It is ok to like yourself and live as yourself, as you currently are. But, we need to think of our health and try to improve. Not just our weight but our lives in every way. The slogan on my blog is “Life keeps happening even when you don’t look like you fit in”. This is exactly how I feel as a large woman having my own life with good days, bad days and every day trying to be myself.

Having said all that, I do read and keep track of current trends, facts and social networking. I’m really interested in the paleo diet right now. I routinely read other blogs about BBW fashion, large women and campaigns about body image. I read about health issues and experience a few personally. I network with other large women through my content curation, BBW Life, on Scoop.it.

I am not a medical professional but my life has been full of all the experiences and challenges of being a fat woman. I’ve tried diets, fitness plans and I have lost some weight but put it back on again. Like most large people I know how to get fit but I have all the trials and errors along the way which have kept me the size I am. Over all, I am ok with me, lumps, bumps and all.

I don’t think a topic about obesity should focus on diet, exercise or weight loss. Health is more important than actual size. Body image is more important than appearances. I’d like to showcase plump, chubby, fat, obese women, helping but not limiting them.

Of course, now that I’ve sent it in, the first thing I notice is a typo I missed.

Bring Back Donna Noble (to Doctor Who)

doctor donnaDonna Noble (Catherine Tate) is special. She was one of the very few (if only) Doctor Who companions who was a mate, just a friend and yet a really good friend. Donna started with a Christmas episode with the 10th Doctor. She was swept away from her wedding and off to an adventure with Doctor Who.

At one point Donna was the most important woman in all of creation (she saved the whole of reality from the Daleks). Then she was left back at home to go on with her life, not even knowing she had been so much more.Her adventure ended (far too soon) when the Doctor had to erase her memory of everything they had done and accomplished together. It was a tragic ending. A sad ending.

Donna Noble should have had so much better. In a later episode they brought her back as the 10th Doctor was dying – as a way of making amends (to fans I think) Donna was given a winning lottery ticket as she married someone else. To wrap things up with a tidy bow – the money for the ticket came from her Father who was deceased in the present.

Donna was gone too soon. She had so much potential and so much more storyline could have been developed – it wasn’t right to take her away and try to tie up the loose ends in a pretty bow for fans.

How could I ever go back to normal life after seeing this? I’m going to travel with that man forever. Donna Noble.