A Warmer for Your Mouse Clicker Hand

It’s one of those things you sort of thing about but forget later. Your hand, the one up on your desk, clicking the mouse. That hand sometimes gets cold. I think being up higher than your elbow, the blood doesn’t flow as well to the ends of those fingers. So, that hand is cold and your other hand is warm, or at least room temperature.

So here is a solution to cold hand mouse: the USB mouse pad warmer.

Inside the mouse pad, under your hand, is a plate which warms up. Your hand goes into the pocket, with your mouse. The mouse cord pokes through the other end to plug into your computer.

Does it work with a wireless mouse? I’m not sure. I thought I would get one for my Mom. But, shop around if you want one. Prices vary from under $10 to over $50, on Amazon. eBay had the same looking mouse pads for much less.

You can also make your own. The heated plate with a USB cord can be bought for about $10 (more or less) and then all you really need is something to wrap around your hand and the warming plate. Make a pocket for the plate and another for your hand, in case the plate gets too warm or doesn’t react well to moisture from your warm hands.

Paper Dolls: Cut Them Out and Dress Them Up

Originally published to my HubPages account.

Paper dolls can be standing fashion dolls with clothes and accessories you hang on the doll by tabs. Paperdolls can also be a chain of cut out dolls, all holding hands. Pretty different, but the same name.

Do you remember the first time you had a book of paper dolls and clothing? My Mother bought me one when I was in the hospital. (I had asthma and would be there for at least a few days every year).

I don’t remember what those paperdolls looked like any more but I do remember carefully cutting out the dresses, purses, boots, shoes, lingerie, and hats too. Everything had tabs which were folded down over the back of the doll to keep them on her.

There are two kinds of paperdolls. One is the type which you get in a book with all her own clothes and accessories. Then there are the paper dolls which you cut out from paper in a chain, all joined at the hands. I like making these too. But you almost need a pattern so your dolls don’t turn out looking odd. Of course, once you get the hang of it you can make them just by cutting the folded paper.

Use a Printer to Make your Own Paperdoll

You can make your own paperdolls (if you have a computer printer).

Find an image of an old doll, or a fashion doll or even a model posing in a photograph. Save it to your computer. Resize it as you like.

If you find a paperdoll with dresses and accessories to print you won’t need to create the dresses and accessories yourself. If you use an image which doesn’t come with a wardrobe, style up clothes and accessories and scan them to be printed. Use the way the doll is posed as your guide for drawing her clothes. (They need to fit her, however she is posed).

Print the outfits on regular paper. Print the doll on thicker paper if you have it. Or, glue the doll from regular paper onto a thicker cardboard paper.

Carefully cut out the doll and her wardrobe. Trim the edges. Make sure you leave tabs for the outfit and accessories. The tabs will be folded down to keep them on the doll. Without tabs everything will just slip off.

Add a popsicle stick or a plastic drinking straw, to the back of your paperdoll to give it extra strength for standing and lasting through all her wardrobe changes.

Keep your original images stored on your hard drive or a DVD, so you can replace them as the doll and her wardrobe wear out.

How Do you Spell Paperdoll/ Paper Doll?

I see paperdoll spelled as one compound word or as two words? Which is the right way?

Making Paper Chain Dolls

Creative Paperdolls and Paper Doll Making

Crochet Flower Enthusiast

I Love Crochet Flowers

Crochet flowers are not a new thing but there are endless new ideas and patterns you can find online now. They are beautiful, colourful and glamorous add-ons for clothing and accessories. Look for a crochet flower purse, hats and of course, hair accessories.

These flowers come from AnnieDesign, on Etsy.

Some crochet flowers are very intricate but most are not too hard for a crochet beginner to pick up. Give them a try!

I learned to crochet on my own. It was frustrating! No matter what I did I could not seem to get past the part where you move to the next ring of the granny square. Now, I don’t know what blocked me. At the time I can remember trying over and over and over.

Finally I did get it. Somehow it all just clicked. I made a mountain of granny squares and began looking at ways to use them.

Then, I wanted more projects to try. Simple things. After my early learning efforts with crochet I thought my brain would need a break before getting into a big, complicated project. But, that didn’t stop me from picking out several great things I wanted to make. One being a tea cozy with a couple dozen crochet flowers on top. My Grandmother had one from a Christmas Bazaar one year. She gave it away to someone else later. I have always wanted one since then. It is just one of those perfectly romantic things. Not so girlie that I couldn’t stand it after a week, but beautiful and feminine.

Anyway, I started making simple crochet flowers. I haven’t progressed far from there. My aspirations for the tea cozy, a crochet dress I found and a crochet quilt in the style of a patchwork crazy quilt, are all on a shelf still.

I can understand why some people don’t try to DIY and go with the pay someone to do it instead. But, even though you don’t need to wait nearly as long or settle for the imperfections you make along the way, there is something great about having conquered something you thought was difficult and worth doing.

Old crochet flowers. I lost track of the source for these, they were from a vintage pattern. A simple pattern I wish I had kept track of too.

Cloth Dolls, Rag Dolls and Doll Making

Dolls are not just for little girls any more. Women are making, keeping, buying and collecting dolls for themselves. Of course, there are dolls for the little women too.

These ragdolls come from an Etsy shop. PeetiePie.

I still think the best dolls for girls are cloth (rag) dolls. You can play with them, cuddle them, sleep with them in your bed, they won’t break if they fall out of bed and – best of all – you can put them in the laundry to wash them.

Another nice thing about cloth dolls is the availability of the material to make them. Cloth is not hard to find. You can buy it new or recycle old clothes (socks work well), bedsheets and pillowcases. You can even make them from some old blankets (like wool, felt, satin and silk) to give them some extra texture.

Rag dolls are stuffed with rags, worn clothes, bedding, anything that can be stuffed inside a doll to keep it both cuddly and washable. This is a great way to use up small scraps of fabric left over from sewing bigger items. Save it all in a cloth bag you can keep adding more to and then stuff away when you have a doll ready to be filled and sewn up.

If you have a pattern you can pretty much get started doll making the same day. However, a pattern isn’t necessary. Trace one side of a human shape (like making paper cut-out dolls or creating your own gingerbread people pattern) on paper. Fold the paper and cut out the shape. This should give you a whole pattern with one head, two arms, two legs and the body trunk holding them all together. If you don’t like your first shape or the dimensions, do it over again.

So far this will be a stiff doll, no bendable joints. You can change that by sewing a straight seam through the legs and arms – after the doll is stuffed. Just use your fingers to manoeuvre the stuffing inside the doll then sew in the gap. Give the doll knees, hips, elbows and shoulders. Don’t sew the neck this way. You don’t want her head to be droopy.

Add some extras like buttons for eyes, yarn for hair and embroidery thread to give her a face. Some people will paint the face instead but I prefer a face that will outlast paint and not fade as paint tends to do over time.

Don’t forget to make doll clothes and accessories like hair ribbons, shoes and a purse too. You can reuse old baby clothes for some of this or be your own fashion designer and create fashions for the dolls you make.

Look at other dolls and doll patterns for more ideas.

Cloth rag dolls are an old, well loved idea.

A rag doll, found in a child’s grave dating from 300 BC Rome is on display at the British Museum. The doll was created from coarse linen and stuffed with rags and papyrus. Remains of coloured wool were found on the head and body. There is a small blue, glass bead attached to the side of the head which suggests it was a hair ornament worn by a female doll. Children in those days also had doll houses and miniature furniture.

The doll was made in Egypt. It likely survived to modern times due to the dry climate there. Old dolls were often made of rags, wood, bone or fired clay. They could be stuffed with rags, sawdust, leaves, or feathers. No doubt other unique materials have been used to stuff a doll over all the years rag dolls have been around. Likely there have been dolls farther back in history but the materials used tend to be perishable so they did not last long enough to be found and accounted for.

The above dolls are also from PeetiePie. I couldn’t resist the girls with glasses.

Cloth and Rag Doll Links

The Old Doll Cover on the Toilet Roll Trick

Not so long ago I made a note for myself to write about those dolls they put inside the toilet paper rolls and then fancy up with a crocheted skirt. Have you seen any of those lately? I can remember seeing one at a Christmas bazaar a few years ago. I think they have lost something in popularity. The question is… what took their place? I don’t know. Maybe all those rolls are just left naked now. Seems a shame.

I know my Grandmother had one. Not the Grandmother I usually enjoyed visiting, except she did play Scrabble. It wasn’t easy to find Scrabble players when I was the oldest of my brother and sisters. I do remember she had a fancy crocheted doll with the legs stuck through the roll and the skirt pulled over the thick roll of paper around her legs. I thought it was clever. I didn’t know there were more of them out there. I’m quite sure it was white and yellow, a brunette doll.

Now, such a long time later, it would be kind of nice to see one of those dolls again. I might even crochet the pattern myself. I can easily pick up a dozen dolls cheap, recycled from the bin at the local thrift shop. It would be nice to give those poor dolls something to do, a job – rather than leaving them homeless.

Crochet N More – A pattern free for personal use.

Craft Bits – A pattern contributed in memory of Irene.

Crochet Pattern Central – A variety of patterns linked to. Covers for various items.

The lovely angel toilet roll cover doll comes from an Etsy shop, JacBerKitcsh.

SturmDM has an doll with an Irish dress, quite fancy.

Lankfords2designs has a doll with a very lovely full skirt.