Semi-Centennial Celebration of Canadian Confederation

This is offered for about $50 on eBay. It’s tempting to buy it for the history but… I’m not doing so well as a collector, closer to being a hoarder with things tucked away rather than on display. So, I didn’t buy it (or put in an offer). But, I am keeping images of it for my own interest (and anyone who happens to read this).

Canada 1867 1917 Semi-Centennial Confederation

Stop Calling them Uniforms

mountiecostumeWhen a uniform becomes customized for various cultures it stops being a uniform. A uniform is… uniform. When it isn’t uniform, all the same, then it becomes similar, not uniform. If the Mounties, police, fire fighters, etc. want to adapt their uniform doesn’t it become a costume? I think allowing various cultures (I am purposely not being specific because the specific culture is not the issue) to have different uniforms makes the uniform mean less.

The original point of a uniform was identification, everyone looking the same, being recognizable and having respect. You see the Mounties and know who they are by the uniform. If you see someone wearing a Mountie costume, you think they are on the way to a party and you don’t consider them someone you need to pay much attention to. Badges don’t mean much from a distance, behind a door or to anyone who couldn’t tell a real badge from a fake one.

People in authority like Mounties, military and government employees need to be recognizable in order to have that authority and be trusted. Since we were children we have seen Mounties in their dress uniforms and we expect a Mountie to be in that uniform.

But, more than the public, what about the Mounties themselves? Why change the uniform which has severed generations of Mounties of all cultures up until now? I’m assuming all Mounties have two arms, two legs, one head so they should all be able to wear the standard uniform. What is the real need for change in this very old tradition worn with pride by generations of people.

I don’t know. But, I do think they should stop calling them uniforms, because they aren’t uniforms any more. That tradition has been lost. mountie

Emily Carr Set of Mugs

Emily Carr (1871-1945)

Prior to 1927, Emily Carr boldly pursued her unique artistic path in isolation from the major art movements taking shape in the Eastern part of Canada. Carr passionately explored the remote native communities of coastal British Columbia, delving into the merger of landscape and cultural objects. From 1927 through the end of her career, Carr enjoyed association with the Group of 7 and subsequent art movements, creating some of her most famous works in the final decade of her life.

Source: Set of 4 Mugs Carr Set of 4 Mugs from McIntosh in South Lancaster, ON from Rob McIntosh