Recycle Pop Cans into Tin Art

I started reading about using pop cans to make pretty tin boxes at Mag Ruffman’s Tool Girl site. I wonder if someone has used this technique to make a tin ceiling. That would be pretty thrifty, crafty and pretty smart recycling too.

I wanted to see other ideas for working with beer and pop/ soda cans. Some were pretty basic, just using them as a can to store things in. Decorating them with things like scraps of fabric, wallpaper, and so on. Squishing them up, adding stuffed animal parts and making them look like road kill, that seemed a little drastic in some way. I was looking for more interesting and unique ideas. Things people really can use and want to have.

I found some links to ideas for re-purposing tin cans in a post on Squidoo. eHow had a post about using recycled soda cans too. Of course, Flickr was where I found the art made with tin cans of all sorts: Altered Tin Can Altered Art in a Tin JimShoresArt has Can-do Fan Tab ulous Aluminum and Tin Can Art

Helen Harle has a book showing how to create jewelry with upcycling pop cans. Create Colorful Aluminum Jewelry: Upcycle cans into vibrant necklaces, rings, earrings, pins, & bracelets.

The Korean TV artist who inspired fetish photography

The intriguing intersection between New-York born photographer Eric Kroll, renowned for his tantalizing, latex-laden fetish portraits and Korean-American visual artist and sculptor Nam June Paik began in Manhattan. According to Kroll, Paik helped to mold him as a young artist from the mid-70s onwards, elevating his art and teaching him “the importance of including absurdity in my work”.

A provocateur of media art, Nam June Paik utilised video and television in new and creative ways from the early 60s. He was one of the first artists to successfully marry the mediums of art and technology, with works such as Nixon, a sculpture made of cathode-ray-tube televisions, and Bakelite Robot.

Eric Kroll is a Dazed regular, having unearthed his shots of the roadside sex joints of 70s America for the Autumn issue. Drawing from the likes of bondage photographers such as Man Ray, Kroll captures fetishism placed in unconventional positions: women adorned with cactus needles, cellophane or seeds, wearing leather and red rubber.

The images from Kroll illustrate the artistic duo’s colourful, collaborative encounters. From a portrait of Paik playing emperor, to snaps of the artist and his multi-sensory pieces, across decades.

A recent gallery installation highlights the creative relationship between the pair: featuring raw and intimate photos of Paik, captured by Kroll, as well as original drawings and sculptures. Kroll also showed a never-before-seen video documentation of Paik’s work creating a video sculpture. Working together between 1977 and 1994, one of their most notable collaborations is Reclining Buddha, displaying Playboy centerfold Nicole Woods.

The reality artist using makeup to fight the patriarchy

Pin It

Signe PiercePhotography Marina Fini

A regular on the art scenes of New York and LA, Signe Pierce is calling bullshit on ‘empowering feminist’ advertising and the way products are sold to fuel our sense of self-worth. Through a combination of performance art, installation and photo prints, Pierce is creating accessible, intersectional feminist art in a world where companies cashing in on female empowerment is a pervasive and problematic normality. Fascinated by the American landscape of abandoned shopping malls and the cultural shift of more and more of us living life largely online, Pierce’s work deals with ideas of capitalism and identity through a dreamy, flashing-neon lens.

Despite her expressing a distaste for “pretentious” and sterile art fairs, Art Basel has played a significant role in Pierce’s career. It was at the festival two years ago that her now-viral short American Reflexxx premiered. A collaboration between Pierce and Alli Coates, the short saw her descend on South Carolina’s Myrtle Beach in a blue mini-dress, stripper heels and a reflective mirror mask. Without ruining the hard-to-watch video for those yet to see it, the 14-minute short sees Pierce subjected to misogyny, transphobia and physical aggression. Since its internet debut earlier this year, the video has been viewed more than 1.5 million times on YouTube, picked up by international news outlets,  and used by teachers to educate students on LGBTQ rights. And while it may have been the internet, not the Art Basel premiere, that catapulted the short film to popularity, Pierce still decided to debut two new works at the fair this year. Following on from her recent performances, we speak to the cyberfeminist about life after American Reflexxx, art-industry snobbery and the importance of keeping it sleazy.

During Art Basel this year you performed a ‘make-up tutorial’, ‘U R Wut U Eat’, at an abandoned pharmacy. How did this performance come about?

The Pharmacy was an hour-long performance curated by Otionfront Studios, which is a collective of performance artists who run a studio out of Bushwick, Brooklyn. In my opinion, they are staging some of the most interesting experimental performance pieces in New York right now, with performance art duo FlucT (Monica Mirabile and Sigrid Lauren) serving as the founders and lead curators. The event featured a fusion of works by performance group BUOY (Bailey Nolan, Viva Soudan and Ellen Robin Rosenberg), Richard Kennedy, a collaboration between India Menuez, Alexandra Marzella and Claire Christerson, Otionfront (Mirabile, Lauren, Kathleen Dycaico, Gina Chiappetta and Sarah Kinlaw), and myself.

What made you want to experiment with make-up in your work?

I’ve been toying with make-up tutorials-as-art performances for a year or so, and for ‘U R Wut U Eat’ I used materials that you would typically ingest in order to bring ‘the beauty that’s on the inside, out.’  

The overarching theme of this particular performance was using typical pharmacy remedies to help you get through the nauseating expectations of the patriarchy. ‘Rub Muscle Milk on your face to help tighten your face muscles for when men inevitably tell you to ‘Smile!’’, ‘Use Adderall for a pop of colour on your eyelids to give you energy while working twice as hard to earn less than your male co-workers,’ ‘Drink your own blood for those classic Taylor Swift red lips that never go out of style.’ There’s a comedic slant to the monologues, I want them to be funny and irreverent as I’m slathering toothpaste and Adderall all over my face, but the overarching message is political. It’s a deconstruction of the pressures and outside forces that consume women within their own identities. I’m also going to be filming a series of these make-up tutorials to be released as an interactive show in 2016. 

Pin It

U R Wut U Eat- Signe PierceU R Wut U Eat Photography Walter Wlodarczyk

During the art fair you also took part in a group immersive installation called ‘Motelscape’, which seemed much more of a polished experience than ,U R Wut U Eat’ yet still nowhere near the traditional gallery context by any means. How did you get involved with ‘Motelscape’ and what was involved in the installation?

‘Motelscape’ is the lovechild of me and my two friends/collaborators Marina Fini and Sierra Grace. We’ve been working on the concept of doing an immersive installation inside of a motel for months. Marina lives in LA and is a plexiglass furniture and jewellery designer, as well as a being a dope photographer and stylist, and Sierra lives in Miami and is one of my favorite photographers and artists. We’re all very inspired by one another, and the worlds that we capture in our individual works, so a love motel seemed like the perfect setting to exhibit collectively.

Sierra scouted around some various motels and the Miami Princess Hotel ended up being this perfect, 80s sleaze haven. We chose the love suite, which featured a heart-shaped bed, jacuzzi and a stripper pole, and infused it with our love of lush, colourful lighting and interior decoration. We chose to exhibit our photos by printing them on towels, pillowcases, and lenticulars, and collaborated with light artist Sydney Krause to create custom neon and LED pieces. We also worked with LA by way of Kansas City fashion designer, Peggy Noland, to make a shower curtain collage from our Tumblr feeds. Marina debuted a custom line of plexiglass furniture and installed a holographic floor, and we worked together to curate the lighting design to exude a specific glow that’s reflective of our photo and video work. We wanted it to be an escape from the pretentious art fairs that consume South Beach, and to inject some colour, vibrance and guerilla technique into the Art Basel experience.  

We also produced an accompanying zine, which we thought would be a cool, accessible way of compiling our photo work and giving people an idea of our individual styles, as well as exposing our work to new audiences.

Pin It

MotelscapeMotelscape Photography Marina Fini

“The word ‘feminism’ can often feel binary, but I think that the cyberfeminist movement is interested in eliminating these binaries by advocating a concept of expanding identities beyond the limits of our bodies and/or assigned genitalia to be something more than human”– Signe Pierce

American Reflexxx, a film created by you and Alli Coates, received an amazing response earlier this year. How did it feel to move forward as an artist after the media attention the short attracted?

It was thrilling to get that piece out there into the world after sitting on it for quite some time. We had been screening it at art fairs and festivals for most of 2014 so we halted on immediately uploading it to YouTube. The feedback has been so incredibly positive and overwhelming. It’s exciting as an artist to watch your work touch people on such a human level. I loved that millions of people were exposed to an art film and that we didn’t need some kiss of approval from the art world to make it happen. Art should be accessible to everyone, not just multi-millionaire collectors and dealers.  

Your work seem to be focussed around themes of digital living, feminism and queer identity. Do you feel like these are themes that are taken seriously at big art fairs such as Art Basel?

I don’t know that they’re necessarily taken seriously at the art fairs, because it seems to me that those fairs thrive on a more facile, money-driven agenda. That’s not to say there isn’t great work at the art fairs, there absolutely is. But I personally don’t attend art fairs in search of an authentic artistic revelation. I think the money side of the art world is pretty antithetical to the reasons that a lot of artists create work in the first place, which is such a bizarre paradox. But even though the bloated, excessive spectacle of Art Basel can often be eye-roll-inducing, I think it’s important to stage these gallery pop-ups and performances to remind people that not all art has to be attached to a five figure price tag or staged in a big white tent to make it good or worth seeing. The best and most provocative art usually isn’t.

Pin It

MotelscapeMotelscape Photography Marina Fini

The concept of cyberfeminism is one that has recently seen a surge in popularity. As someone who identifies with the movement, what does cyberfeminism mean to you?

It’s interesting the way that word/concept has been experiencing such a strong resurgence in the past year or two, because it’s been around since the 80s and has experienced many thought waves. For me it is a continuation of ideas from the women who pioneered these concepts before the internet became what it is today. Women like Donna Haraway (author of A Cyborg Manifesto) and VNS Matrix (who penned A Cyberfeminist Manifesto), who were writing about the burgeoning digital evolution as being instrumental for women to reclaim their bodies, minds and identities through technology, which is happening very actively in 2015.

I will stress that it’s important to me, that I want our political ideals and agendas to not be limited to the notions of just those who identify as ‘female’ – the spectrum is too limitless for that. The word ‘feminism’ can often feel somewhat binary, but I think that the cyberfeminist movement is interested in eliminating these binaries by advocating a concept of expanding identities beyond the limits of our bodies and/or assigned genitalia to be something more than human. I think that women who live their lives presentationally on the internet are doing a lot for the movement, whether or not they identify as ‘cyberfeminist’ is up to them. Off the top of my head, I personally am inspired by the works of Molly Soda, Juliana Huxtable, May Waver, Alexandra Marzella, and Vasilisa Forbes in terms of reclaiming a space online to be open advocates for the ways that our bodies and identities are consumed and perceived.

What else did you check out during the week at Art Basel?

I was so busy working on the installation and performance that I didn’t have a chance to see as much as I wanted to. I saw Sophie DJ on Thursday night which was cool, I love what they’re doing by fusing music with conceptual/visual art. I saw Vector Gallery’s installation at the Satellite Art Fair, which I loved. And I checked out the Scope Art Fair, which had some good stuff and also some awful stuff.  

I know this may sound cliche, but I find the things we see in day-to-day life to be just as artful as something that was explicitly created with artistic intention. Art imitates life. I saw a Barbie Jeep floating in a parking lot in Little Havana when I was walking with Marina on Friday, and it made me feel more than anything else that I saw walking through the hotels and art fairs. I took a photo of it and dubbed it ‘Drowning Barbie Jeep’, dedicated to Marcel Duchamp. Driving around the Florida suburbs and seeing the reality of life outside of the bougie art fairs was also a highlight of the trip, both in terms of leisure and in terms of seeing interesting art. I plan on returning there in the next year or two to do some extended documentation about that world.

Keep up with Signe Pierce here

10 Little Things you can do to Make your Bedroom Sexy

pinterest.com

blakeshotels.com
Source: Pinterest

  • a headboard
  • lighting
  • bedding
  • pillows
  • furniture
  • nightstand
  • art on the walls
  • drapes
  • paint or wallpaper
  • rugs

Your dream bedroom is just around the corner…. All it takes is a little redecorating and reorganizing to get the beautiful bedroom you’ve always dreamed of.

Source: 10 Little Things You Can Do to Beautify Your Bedroom | Martha Stewart

Martha has the right idea but not the same direction I’m thinking.

The most important thing in your bedroom is the bed itself.

There is nothing sexy about an old mattress or one too cheap for a good sleep. Before you spend money on any bedroom decorating take care of your practical needs. Invest in yourself with a great mattress.

Colours

Now, think about some of your favourite things. What makes you feel luxurious, romantic and sensual? Which colours work for you? It may not be the traditional red. Purple, is a great colour but don’t forget to consider blue, green, yellow and assorted shades of all the rest. The right colours will go a long way and colour is a wonderful way to set the mood and create an atmosphere.

Add the colours you want to your bedroom with all Martha’s ideas: throw rugs, extra pillows, paint your walls or furniture. Be sparing with patterns, think of them as a feature or an accent. However, even solid colours can have a texture or shine for a sexier look. You can find endless great ideas online, try a Pinterest search if you don’t know where to start, for home decorating. Your only real limit is how much you can spend. The more you can do yourself the better, but spend a little when you can’t do it all.

Details

Treat yourself to something extra special when you can. In particular I’m thinking an elegant chandelier. You need light after all. If you get lucky you could find an amazing chandelier and matching lamps for your bedside table, dresser, or desk. Consider a chandelier before other mood lighting. Do those strings of holiday lights or little pot lights really make you feel all that sensual?

Not everyone will be wild on the idea of adding mirrors to their bedroom. But, seeing yourself full length every day isn’t as horrifying as you may imagine. It can build up your confidence because you see yourself as you are rather than as you think you are. It’s also a good way to double check for stray threads, labels, and all the other little things. Plus, a full length mirror can come with a luxurious, decadent frame.

Try browsing flea markets, local artists shops for unique items (not just art for the walls but furniture, flower vases, lamps, etc.). Don’t buy something to make do or fill a space. Clutter is not going to make your bedroom sexier, just messier. Pick furniture and art you really must have! Don’t settle for less. (A great way to keep the clutter down is to move things to other rooms in your home or, give them away as gifts to good homes).

Appeal to more than just the visual senses. Throw rugs should feel good beneath your feet, or your bottom on occasion. Flowers can be nice but they aren’t reliable as scent in the room. Don’t OD on scent – find something pleasant rather than overbearing. Keep a DVD player and DVD’s available. I still like the radio myself.

This means that your bedroom should express YOU and have in and around it furniture, artwork, clothes and items that are deeply personal. An attractive bedroom with all new furniture and no real character is not sexy. Additionally, I’ve always found that women whose bedrooms express their older, mature sides are sexier than younger rooms that look like holdovers from college. Women are sexier than girls, so let go of the Victoria’s Secret PINK decor, or “my bedroom is just my crashpad” and kick it up a notch.

apartmenttherapy.com

Source: Ten Tips for The Sexiest Bedroom… Like Ever (And also for finding love) | Apartment Therapy

I like the ornate mirror and the way the walls and ceiling are done here. I would love an old fashioned engraved tin ceiling.

pinterest.comSource: Fireplace | Shabby chic * Romantic chic * Cottage chic * Beach chic | Pinterest | Fireplaces

A real fireplace would be great but not at all practical for me. Instead I could find something electric which only looks wood burning.

lacquerandlinen.com

Source: Anouska Hempel Revamps London’s Blakes Hotel | Lacquer & Linen

Maybe too much red. But… I really like it!

adesignideas.com

Source: 16 Sensual And Romantic Bedroom Designs | Design Ideas

I like the big mirror on the floor. A casual, simple thing but it gives the setting a little history/ mystery to be not quite perfectly polished.

homedesignetc.comhomedesignetc.com

Source: 20 Romantic Master Bedroom Design Ideas

In these I like the chandeliers and I love the clunky, solid, furniture (the bed and the dresser off to the side). I don’t know about painting the furniture. Covering the wood makes me feel guilty, but I do like the way they look once they are painted.

 

pinterest.compinterest.com

Source: Pinterest | Faux Fur, Fur and Restoratio…

I’d love to have this faux/ fake fur in my room, on my bed. It looks very lush and touchable.

pinterest.compinterest.com

Source: SEXY♥BEDS | Pinterest | Tree Bed, Beds and Trees

I also like the rustic, fairytale look. My perfect bedroom would be some combination of lusty red colours, elegant, polished, romantic but looking like something you could walk through and find in the pages of a fairytale. Secret niches, marked by a mysterious past but with a very comfortable bed.

Women are Out of Fashion

One huge benefit to using males as female models… no one will ask them to cover their nipples.

What do you think of men walking down the runway in women’s clothing? Doesn’t sound so far fetched these days, and it isn’t. The funny thing is how well it actually works.

Men have a skinnier shape, more like a clothes rack. If he does put on a little weight, he can lose weight faster and easier than women anyway. Men tend to be taller too.

Men don’t menstruate or get pregnant. Less missed days at work. Less risk of leakage on clothes, bloating, mood swings, or any other side effects from the monthly visitor.

Men still get paid more than women so selling women’s fashions to crossdressing or transgender people makes good business sense too. Although they may have to lower their prices because everyone knows women pay more for clothes, hair cuts, etc., than men.

Looks like we are out of fashion, ladies!

In the performing arts men were playing women’s roles in theatre long before Shakespeare was still writing plays. I guess all those skinny women will have to find a man to support them (and his children).

Don’t think I’m posting this as a feminism thing. It is and yet it isn’t really about feminism. This is so much a reflection of our culture and the changes it has been going through. Where is it going and how will things continue to evolve? How strange would it be if women became second class citizens useful for baby-making, cooking and cleaning?  There is a great science fiction story in there…

Maison Margiela SS16

Despite the event being a womenswear show, that gang included not just girls but guys – although, dressed in the same slinky, skin-exposing jumpsuits and jackets as their female counterparts, their presence went…

Source: Meet the boys leading Margiela’s gender revolution

The PowerPuff Girls Get Tickled

Do you remember the PowerPuff Girls? I’m never 100% sure about taking something created for children and turning it into something adult/ sexual. But, this is kind of cute and (for the most part) they are just being tickled. bubbles_knows_what_s_coming_by_europeandragon-d7ypu5h buttercup_loves_it_by_europeandragon-d7ylrv5 girls__night_by_europeandragon-d7x672f

Source: European Dragon on DeviantArt (You may need an account to view the gallery due to mature content notices).