Just What Every Christmas Tree Needs: A Merman Ornament. – if it’s hip, it’s here

merman ornament

When it comes to random themed Christmas Tree decorations, the Mermen collection of ornaments ranks way up there. Last year I introduced you to the raunchiest ornaments I could find and although it’s hard to beat Pornaments for slightly subversive and sexy tree embellishments, Mermen come awfully close.

handcrafting the merman

Clearly designed for the gay market, they also appeal to those with aquatic fetishes or the many who pride themselves on collecting the most bizarre ornaments they can find. All types of glitter embellished resin bare-chested hunks with fishtails made by December Diamonds are available, from Goalies to Pirates. Hand made with care, the ornaments are made of a light composite resin and they add new ones each year to their collection. While they also make Mermaids and other aquatic themed baubles, the Mermen are the most popular. And they sell out quickly, because they really are fabulous.

Here are just a few:
candy can and hoodiemermen ornaments 1Surf and pearl diver mermantool and timberofficer and rangerDallas and StudBiceps and Fiftypride and clambakeJagger and H20Mario and BoTriton merman and logo

And of course, King Neptune (aka Santa):
Santa merman

Remember, these are only a few. There are a lot more to choose from including Mermaids, couples and more.
Shop for Merman Ornaments here

Just What Every Christmas Tree Needs: A Merman Ornament. – if it’s hip, it’s here.

Source: Just What Every Christmas Tree Needs: A Merman Ornament. – if it’s hip, it’s here

A Stick in the Mud for Wind Power

The Vortex bladeless turbine uses the wind to vibrate instead of spin. That makes it cheaper, quieter, and more reliable than a bladed turbine.

Source: This wind turbine has no blades — and that’s why it’s better | Grist

My first question… Does it still create as much energy as the turbines with blades? (It doesn’t).

My next question… What about the birds? I can understand how birds and bats fly into them. The colour is meant to blend into the sky (for human sensibilities, not birds).

As far as noise, we parked right next to one here in Ontario. Turned off the car (the car made more sound than the turbine) and just listened for half an hour. It was very quiet. Out on a backroad, in the middle of nowhere, for awhile we felt apart from all civilization. That feeling of being still after the world has ended.

Without blades the new wind power could be very low maintenance and have far less parts to replace. That’s a good thing.

But, they do produce less energy. The solution offered in the article is to have more of them. Is this practical?

How many can be grouped together before they lose efficiency due to blocking the very wind they rely on? How many land owners are going to want a forest of these on their land? How long will it be before the same people who protested the noise of wind turbines find these have a persistent hum or vibration or some other problem which gives them headaches?

I’m not sure a lot of the complaining about wind turbines is really justified. At least the human complaining.

Bladeless turbines may be less deadly to birds and bats, but we can’t be sure of that.

What will happen with more turbines in the same area of land?

There are no perches for birds. We don’t want to encourage the birds to use them, yet a forest of wind turbines take up space without giving the birds a place to rest.

Of course, the bladeless turbines will also be a colour intended to blend in and not obstruct too much of the view, for humans. Birds may fly into these man made forests and not see what they flew smack into. To a bird a forest of nearly invisible tree stalks without perches or branches waving in the wind to show their location may not work out so well.

Could these ivory towers be made nature friendly at the risk of becoming less tolerated by humans who enjoy the energy produced by them? Could bird houses, bee hives and bat boxes be included? Could they be made mandatory? Would that be unsightly or just unnatural?

A New Poinsettia Pin

I ordered this poinsettia brooch. I often find things I’d like to order but settle for an image saved to my blog. But, I love a poinsettia or Christmas tree brooch to wear each year around the holidays. So I bought it. There are rhinestones in the middle and the shade of red looks really good, at least online.
Source: Poinsettia Pin with Gift Box | Hudson’s Bay

Christmas Card Trees

xmascardtree

These free-standing paper Christmas trees add colorful, country charm to your Christmas decor. Cut various size circles out of Christmas cards, scalloping the edges of some. From the center of each circle cut out a 3/16-inch pie-shaped wedge. Curl the circle into a cone shape (pattern side up), overlap the ends, and tape the back.

To make the base, cut a 2-inch foam ball in half and a 1/8-inch dowel to desired height. Place the foam ball flat side down, add a drop of hot glue to an end of the dowel, and push the dowel through the foam ball until it stops. Slide the largest cone shape down the dowel, and then twist a small rubber band around the dowel; continue alternating progressively smaller cone shapes with rubber bands. Top the paper Christmas tree with the smallest cone shape and a ribbon.

via Christmas Card Projects: Decorative Ways to Recycle Christmas Cards.

Found a Good Post About Fetish Fashion

This is two paragraphs snipped from the original post. It was a good post, quite a bit of history and some new things to learn more about.

High-heeled shoes, so-called “kinky” boots, corsets, lingerie, and garments made of leather or rubber are among the most common clothing fetishes. Sometimes individual clothing fetishes are combined; thus, a black leather corset might be worn with high-heeled boots and long rubber gloves. Fetishes are associated with particular sexual fantasies. Or as Stoller put it: “A fetish is a story masquerading as an object.” In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, fetish clothing was utilized in secret sexual scenarios; for example, in brothels or the staging of pornographic imagery. Since the 1970s, however, clothing fetishes have played an increasingly important role in fashion and popular culture. As early as the 1960s, the television program The Avengers featured a character, Mrs. Peel, who wore a black leather catsuit that was modeled on an authentic fetish costume. Mrs. Peel’s costume was a precursor of Michelle Pfeiffer’s latex catsuit and mask in the film Batman Returns.

Fetishism moved from the sexual underground into mainstream popular culture via subcultural groups such as punks and leathermen. A youth subculture associated with bands like the Sex Pistols, the punks appropriated fetish clothing as part of their own “style in revolt.” The fashion designer Vivienne Westwood, herself a punk, opened a shop in London called Sex, where she sold bondage trousers, rubber stockings, corsets, and extreme shoes to a clientele divided between real fetishists and young people attracted by the idea of breaking taboos. Westwood herself wore “total S&M as fashion” in the early 1970s, not just in private or at clubs, but on the street, as a way of subverting accepted social values.

Love to Know: Fetish Fashion