Where the Wild Things Are: Death and Dying

Originally posted to ‘BackWash: Where the Wild Things Are’ newsletter, May, 16, 2004.

My Dad is quite likely going to die soon, any day now. Don’t worry about sending sympathy, condolences or anything of that sort. You don’t know him. For me it’s a lot more personal.

People think the dying become almost holy. As if, while dying, they change and become a better person all of a sudden. You can’t talk badly about them, you must visit them and you should really, really hold their hand.

Well, my Dad was not a nice, happy, friendly Dad. His dying hasn’t changed that. I don’t want to hold his hand. I don’t want to go in and see him now that he is becoming a pile of meat rather than a human being. Sure, I can stick my hand inside a turkey each Thanksgiving and pull out the little bag of goodies. That doesn’t mean I want to do the same sort of ghoulish thing with my Dad. So, I am visiting him (second time will be today after work) but I am not going to touch him.

What do you believe about death? That gets tested each time someone close to us (physically or emotionally) dies. I still believe in reincarnation. I still believe the body becomes about as useful as roadkill once the person inside is gone. I still think the best body disposal method is compost in the family garden rather than taking up space in a graveyard plot. I’d much rather have my remains sucked up by worms and trees than rotting away in an expensive box.

Am I grossing you out? Am I being too blunt? Do you not want to think about death in such a practical way? Too bad. Death is part of life. There is no getting away from it. Death is always there, waiting at the end. That, I very strongly believe.

I’m not afraid of death. I’m just in no hurry to get there. I’d miss too many things. Every ordinary day, new inventions and ideas, seeing the tulips each Spring and so on.

Anyway, my Dad wants to be cremated. It looks like he will soon have his wish. I don’t think I will miss him. But I’m doing my best to be a good daughter now, in these last days. Not for him, not for myself especially, but for my brother and sisters who seem to expect something grand and dramatic and perfect. As if now that he is about to kick off forever we should honour him for the things he did right.

Foraging 2.0: Grafting Fruit-Bearing Branches To Neutered City Trees

Foraging 2.0: Grafting Fruit-Bearing Branches To Neutered City Trees: SFist.

This is interesting to me because we gathered apples from abandoned farms and along the roadside from trees which were pretty forgotten. These apples would be heritage seeds and possibly types of apples no longer grown commercially. Yet they were often a stronger or better type of apple, resistant to bugs and disease. But unpopular for some other reason.

The idea grafting branches never occurred to me. It would give you the chance to have apples much sooner than growing a new tree from seed. Also, a lot of trees grown from seed just don’t make it. Grafting would have a better chance for success, though need more time to keep the tree from going back to it’s roots, literally.

A Different Way to Eat Men

I noticed this on FemDom Artists (the post was titled, Men Are Fun to Eat) first.

It originally comes from Nouar’s Numnums, a painter in the US. She has an evil sense of humour.

I like this. It’s a good spin on men and oral sex. The term cock sucker really annoys me. Why is it something they want done for them and yet they make the term for it a bad, dirty word. You can’t have it both ways. If cock sucker is a bad thing you boys better stick to your blow up dolls, knots in trees, sheep or whatever else you stick yourself into.

I’d prefer to eat men like the ladies in the illustration. Whatever you may want to call them, they aren’t cock suckers. (Though they may laugh while they bite it off).

Eat your Christmas Tree

 
What You Will Need:

• Cupcakes, any flavor
• Sweetened Whipped Cream
• Green Food Coloring
• Chopped candied fruit, red

Equipment Need:

• Icing Bag
• Open Star Icing Tip

How To:

1. Whip whipping cream till stiff peaks form.

2. Reserve some plain white icing for the floret border and add a tiny drop of green food color to the rest.

3. Mix the color into the cream very lightly to get a marbled effect.

4. Spread this icing on each cupcake with an icing knife or spatula.

Making the Trees
1. Mix in green food coloring to the remaining icing to make the trees.

2. Fit an icing bag with an open star tip (No. 17 or 18) and fill the bag with the green whipped cream.

3. To start making the trees, pipe out cream in center of the cupcake and bring outwards. For the first few lines, bulge out the icing in the center and then bring out. This will give the base of the tree some height for the other ‘branches’ to stand.

Floret Border:
With the same icing tip and plain white whipping cream, make little florets all around the edge of the cupcake.
Pipe out cream and press slightly on the same place to form a little floret. Make florets close to each other all around the rim.
Decorations:
1. Sort out red colored candied fruit from a mixed pack or use dried red berries.
2. Chop them up and puck into the trees to make tree decorations.
Tips:
Whether preparing for your family or for a party, assembly line is the best way to get these done quick and well. Spread cream icing on all cupcakes first and then make trees on all of them.
Try making the trees and florets on a plate first. Once you get the hang of it, start making them on the cupcakes.