Senate ASCII Art Signature

I like architecture. I’ve never seen the US Senate building (except in photos) so I don’t know how well this resembles the real thing. I like it. I tried to diddle it (fixing the lines which are not quite in sync) but it’s a bit of a push me – pull ya. A puzzle for another day, maybe. I’m posting the original first. Then my work on it. First the original recreated in Notepad and then my diddle of it.

senateusSource: Lindsey Cormack (@DCInbox) | Twitter

ussenateascii

Hiroshima: Like a Graveyard with not a Tombstone Standing

60% of the US people still think this was the right thing to do. (Classic “not in my backyard” thinking).

Today is the 70th anniversary of the first atomic bomb being dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, by a US aircraft.

The bombing – and a second one on Nagasaki three days later – claimed the lives of at least 140,000 people in the city. Half died slowly, over several weeks/ months from radiation, burns and dehydration.

hiroshimabeforeafter

nagasakibeforeafter

This war poster makes me think of all those movies where the US saves the world from… aliens, natural disasters, monsters, etc. Ironic.japnext

A Japanese report on the bombing characterized Nagasaki as “like a graveyard with not a tombstone standing”

Source: Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki – Wikiwand

 

Women and Friendly Fire

I was watching a US TV show, Bones. The episode was about war heros, men in the war and the afterwards, the after care and how they are not understood or respected for what they went through.

My mind went to women who have been through an attack or stalking and other violence and victimization. We aren’t given much respect, understanding either.

Also, we go through it all alone. We are alone when attacked, no team has our backs, no group of soldiers. Mostly by our own choice because we don’t feel chatty about it all either. So many of the same emotions but so much difference in how people react and how women are misunderstood, blamed and treated afterwards.

Women don’t think to be proud of having survived being preyed on the way soldiers are told to be proud they served their country.

The question is – what do women serve , other than being a survivor, what is there for them to be proud of? Should we think we serve men by being abused? Is that what we can be proud of, like a soldier?

Ironic that the TV show I was watching ended up being about the death and cover up of a soldier killed by friendly fire. Is that how women should look at it? Attack or death by friendly fire? It doesn’t seem friendly to me.

What Makes America the Greatest Country in the World?

theusakingQ&A: “What Makes America the Greatest Country in the World?”.

America is not a country. It’s a landmass made up of two continents: North America and South America. Here, let me describe them…

(Link to the full post is above).

This is my comment:

Thank you for your post! We talk about the same idea, how America and American could mean anyone from North or South America. Why don’t people in the US have their own name for their people? Sometimes we call them USers or USians, but they really should have a better name. I don’t know of any other country which does not have a word or phrase for it’s citizens. It’s kind of weird really.

If we talk to people from the US about this they get all huffy about it. “Americans are Americans!”. But, in fact, Americans could be Mexican or Canadian or Chilean, etc. USians are a people without a name of their own.

Even “United States” or “United States of America” is non-descriptive.  There are other countries with the same name, more or less.

Anyway, I thought it was just a few of us up here in Canada who thought about this at all. Nice to see someone else has noticed.

Our Adventures with the Fiancé Visa (2000 – 2002)

Our Adventures with the Fiancé Visa  was a blog I kept (beginning in about the year 2000 and ending in 2002) while my husband and I were going through the fiancé Visa process. I’m Canadian, he is from the US and now we are divorced and I’m back in Canada and he is still in the US. Anyway, I am keeping these old posts – just moved them to a new location. 

Some of these were originally written by my husband, Todd. He wrote his name at the end of the post. I have included them because they were part of the old blog I copied all of this from. Part of the adventure. 

Following is the checklist:

  • Petition sent.
  • Medical Appt.
  • Consulate Interview.
  • We’re married.
  • EAD
  • Advanced Parole
  • Fingerprinting

The following are from the CanAm Couples Club where Todd and I have found great advice and support for our adventure.

Note: The CanAm Couples Club was part of Yahoo Groups. I can’t find it (at least not still active) so I am not giving the link. 

This list of posts is in reverse order. Start from the bottom if you want to read them chronologically. 

The End

Fingerprinting in St Louis

Got the Parole

Got the EAD in Chicago

Chicago INS Office

Re: Needing Patience

Hello CanAm Club

EAD OS?

Seasons Greetings!

Crossed the Border

THE Interview

Re: Leaving for THE interview on Tuesday

Leaving for THE interview on Tuesday

Night Before Rant Part 2

Yet Another Moment of Panic

December 6th, 2000!

Wait for Interview

Between Checklist and Interview

Re: Medical Experience

First NOA Received

Return Receipt Returned!

We’re off and running!

SheDragon in Toronto

ADIT pics

Reading (even skimming it) has made me feel sad. I can still clearly remember all the emotions that went along with this adventure in my life. It didn’t end the way I thought it would, the way I wanted it to or expected. But, I’m still going, having adventures and finding new things to learn and do.