The Original Idea Behind GreenLivingHistory

I started the idea of Green Living History as a Blogger blog, long ago. I didn’t start it there. Just wrote a description. I really liked the name so I bought the domain. Now, here the poor thing is, neglected.

Rather than importing the lack of content on Blogger, or keeping the blogger site open for no real reason, I am deleting it there and just adding the single little post back in here.

The Idea Behind Green Living History
Green Living History – An idea to blog about the environment, green living, repurposing, natural religion and history.
Posted 27th April 2012 by Laura Brown

The Grass On the Other Side was Greener

Being Green (reprinted from Facebook)

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the older woman, that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment f or
future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were truly recycled.
But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, that we reused for numerous things, most memorable besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property, (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags.

But too bad we didn’t do the green thing back then.

We walked up stairs, because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.

Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.

Back then, we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the green thing back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart ass young person.

How Will the God-Fearing Own Up in the End?

To those who believe in God and the Bible… your book says humans are the stewards/ the caretakers of the Earth. You worry about getting into heaven or going to hell for your sins…

How will you explain the mess the planet is in, the animals being killed by human pollution and human over population and all the rest – to your boss? Do you even think about the production, consumption and packaging which you throw away every day? Do you ever wonder were it all ends up? Do you really try to use less or is it easier to just go ahead and do what you want and just buy more stuff?

When you think about your sins, consider those against the environment, the planet and the life on it. Maybe your God will be upset about the wreckage of the planet more than the small sins you think are so important, to you.

I’m not perfect. I won’t pretend I don’t cause pollution and add to the problems of the planet. But, I do think about the planet and, being human, I do think we are responsible for the planet and our own actions. I don’t expect any higher power to come along and fix everything while forgiving us all for making such a mess of it all.

How to Get Started Doing Parkour

Parkour is a philosophy as well as physical exercise. Parkour is running, dodging, jumping through an obstacle course, on foot and without any special equipment. Parkour is also about learning to live your life in a better way.

What Parkour Really Is: The Whole Picture

Parkour is more than physical exercise or an extreme sport. Parkour is not about buying equipment or gear. Parkour is not about performing tricks or competing or showing off. Parkour is available for any level of athlete, or non-athlete.

Parkour is a philosophy about moving within your environment (mental and physical) and dealing with the obstacles you face. Through Parkour you attempt to understand and improve yourself. Parkour helps us learn to understand and help others by giving us practical skills and the methods of using them.

Parkour teaches us to move in our environment in a way where we can gain the most ground, make real progression and learn how to manoeuvre in different variety of ways.

Parkour can take place in an urban environment. Also, in forests, deserts, any outdoor element or place where there are some obstacles and space to move around them.

Parkour practitioners are called tracuers or tracueses (for women).

One is not truly participating in Parkour without the combination of philosophy and exercise. Parkour is a physical and mental exercise to improve your body at any level of ability, to give you more confidence and change how you see and feel about the world.

How Did Parkour Start?

David Belle was influenced by his Father who grew up in Vietnam as a child soldier trained through obstacle courses known as Parcours. David Belle’s Grandfather taught him about Hebertism. Both of these merged with David’s own philosophy and experiences to become Parkour.

Getting Started: Keep Moving, That’s What Matters

Move around your personal space. Look at the objects in the room differently. Find new ways to move through the room. Take a different route. Walk backwards. Twirl while you move through the room. Skip or hop on one foot. Crawl or walk on your hands if you can. Simple movements are a start. (Don’t wreck the place, go outside to give yourself more room to move).

Remember the old kid’s games where the floor became something dangerous to step on. I used to swim in the public pool and pretend the stripes on the pool floor were giant whales side by side. I tried to avoid stepping on the dark lines between the whales – the dark space between them surely went on forever, sinking deep, down into the ocean. So, I had to swim over them to the next whale.

Important techniques for beginners are good jumping and landing techniques. The roll which limits impact and carries momentum to continue forward movement is an important beginner technique to master. Beginners also learn how to fall, because falling happens. Other beginning moves include monkey vaults and precision jumps.

Don’t start leaping from tall buildings. Find your way along at your own pace. Don’t consider Parkour only as a physical thing either. Think of ways you would like to move through your life, what is keeping you from moving? Could you find a new way to move and gain progress?

Train your mind for Parkour as well as your body. Take a look at puzzles, mazes, things that make you look at new solutions to find your way.

Getting Started: Equipment to Consider

Originally, Parkour was barefoot.

Of course, one nice feature about shoes is the protection of the feet. A tennis shoe should give better traction. Shoes for martial arts are popular for being close to being barefoot. You will want a shoe which is light, comfortable, flexible with a good grip on the ground. Consider snow, rain and sun too, Parkour goes well with the great outdoors.

You could look at wearing gloves to protect your hands. But, like shoes, Parkour doesn’t require any special gear.

You need fabric that can stretch and let your skin breathe, light, casual clothing which you can really move in and sweat in. It’s also important to avoid clothing which could get caught or snag on anything and slow you down or cause you injury.

Parkour Links

 

Rev Up your Inspiration

Let Life In: 12 Ways to Rev Up your Inspiration

We thought it important to first learn more about what one needs to do to let life in, to allow oneself to be open to new ideas and new ways of looking at things.

Here’s what we learned about inspiration.

1. To experience inspiration you have to be open to new ideas, flexible and willing to change. You need to quiet the voice that tells you “I can’t, it’s too hard, it won’t work, I’m too old” or any other downer self talk.

2. Don’t be afraid to put it out there. If you are passionate about your inspiration, others will follow your passion. People will want to find out more about why you love something so much.

3. Use adversity as a learning experience. When something doesn’t work for you, think about how it can be made better. What needs to change? Be the inspiration for that change.

4. Get started. Quickly. Before you allow yourself to talk yourself out of it. “I can’t knit, I have two left hands.” “I’m too old to ballroom dance, surfboard, learn karate,” “I don’t have the time.” If you need to, divide a piece of paper down the middle, write down your excuse and on the left side and in the next column dispute it. And reread the right hand column as often as you need to.

5. Turn off the noise. Noise comes in all kinds of packages. The Internet, the family, the job, the bills, the cell phone, all the distractions. Consider it all noise and remove yourself for a period of time. If need be, seek solitude. Solitude enables you to focus on your mind and body and to tune in to your environment. Inspirations that can’t cut through the noise are subtle. In solitude you can experience them.

6. Don’t attach an outcome. What if your inspiration doesn’t fly? The idea doesn’t work. You really do have two left hands? So what? You’ll learn something from the experience no matter what. You’ll learn so much from the effort that the outcome really doesn’t matter. For achievement oriented individuals, not attaching an outcome is particularly challenging. Go for it.

7. Visualize. Generate the emotions of your inspiration by creating a mental picture. When you picture your dream you will begin to attract what you need to accomplish it.

8. Find a support crew. Ignore the naysayers and surround yourself with people who choose to encourage you. They’ll support you and help you achieve your goal.

9. Teach. When you have an inspiration, teach it to others. None of us knows it all. When you teach, you do your best learning.

10. Don’t accept no for an answer. Just because something’s always been done one way, doesn’t mean there aren’t better ways to do it. Many better mousetraps need to be built. Ask questions, question the answers.

11. Take a risk. Learn to live with uncertainty. Maybe you will fail. Or, more than likely, you’ll feel alive instead of bored. And you might still fail.

12. Pay it forward. You’ve reached a stage in life that enables you to allow others to learn from your experiences. Embrace your life stage and be the inspiration you are waiting for.