Christmas Card Trees

xmascardtree

These free-standing paper Christmas trees add colorful, country charm to your Christmas decor. Cut various size circles out of Christmas cards, scalloping the edges of some. From the center of each circle cut out a 3/16-inch pie-shaped wedge. Curl the circle into a cone shape (pattern side up), overlap the ends, and tape the back.

To make the base, cut a 2-inch foam ball in half and a 1/8-inch dowel to desired height. Place the foam ball flat side down, add a drop of hot glue to an end of the dowel, and push the dowel through the foam ball until it stops. Slide the largest cone shape down the dowel, and then twist a small rubber band around the dowel; continue alternating progressively smaller cone shapes with rubber bands. Top the paper Christmas tree with the smallest cone shape and a ribbon.

via Christmas Card Projects: Decorative Ways to Recycle Christmas Cards.

From the Tiny Revolution: Now Small is Powerful


I used to think that small was beautiful. Rather like a delicate rosebud in a cut-crystal vase. Or a butterfly wing.

Now I know differently. Now I know,

Small is Powerful.

I think we should join together — we the small folk. Because the things we hold dear are life changing.

We value stories, whether they are heard by one, or by many.
We value passion, rippling out from it’s small circles into every widening arcs.
We value the small start, the first try, the handmade, and the good effort.
We value subtle leaders who influence without smoke and mirrors, braggadocio, or hustle.
We value each unique soul, allowing her to bring healing, justice, and beauty to world at her own right-fit pace.

We believe small is powerful — because it has been evidenced in our own lives. Because it changes the lives of others.

Won’t you join this tiny revolution?

 

small-is-beautiful-buttonHere is part of the old small is beautiful tiny revolution. I had it on my site for awhile. Noticed the image was a broken link but kept a watch for it to come back. Today I checked on it and found she has changed her philosophy (and the image file).

A2We believe stories are valuable, no matter how many people read them.
We believe following your passion is more important that watching your site meter.
We believe in the handmade, the first try, the small start, and the good effort.
We believe that small is beautiful.

Cinnamon Bun Cookies

I want to try these. I need to get stocked up on butter and I’m nearly out of milk too. But, don’t these make you crave cinnamon buns? Take a look at the photos on Claudia’s blog.

Would it really be too much to dip these in chocolate? Maybe it the chocolate isn’t overly sweet. It would look pretty good.

Cinnabon Cookie Recipe
From Claudia’s kitchen @What’s Cookin Italian Cuisine
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup confectionery sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Cinnamon Mixture 🙁 2 cups sugar
mixed with 5 3/4 teaspoons cinnamon)

Mix all ingredients in a heavy duty mixing bowl, until a soft ball forms.
On a floured board, roll into short 3 inch ropes, roll the ropes into a mixture of cinnamon and sugar. Roll the rope into rounded circles, bake at 350 degree oven, till brown. Frost them by making a thin frosting.
Frosting
2 cups confectionery sugar
milk to make a thin consistency
1 tablespoon of softened butter
In a bowl mix sugar butter and a little milk beat till smooth, continue adding milk for spreading consistency to be thin. Place cookies on wax paper, spoon a teaspoon of frosting on each cookie. Dry.

Outside the Envelope: Spider Catching Grrls

Outside the Envelope – Spider catching grrls. This is one I drew and then my nieces added to it. I was teasing them about making hot chocolate including fresh spiders as one of the ingredients. (Likely it’s just one of those things you have to be there for at the time). Anyway, when we were doing arts and crafts I drew the three of us catching spiders. I had the bucket and the girls were going to pick them up. Neither liked that idea.

Then Emma Jeanne drew a big sunshine in blue at the top and a big spider in blue at the bottom. Roxanne wanted to make sure everyone would understand the action. So she drew circles around the spiders and arrows pointing to the bucket.

Nice how for me it was just a drawing, something to do while spending time with them. But, for them it was important. So important that they wanted to make sure it was done right and well. That’s why I kept it. I like to remember how important the little things are, especially when you’re still a little person.

Outside the Envelope

Circle Rituals

I’m trying to write about casting a circle for the Wicca and Witchcraft newsletter at BackWash. But… I just can not remember the right term (or the standard term anyway, who says it’s right anyway!) for closing the circle. I know about drawing and casting it to begin with. Anyway, the funny thing is, I’m looking at websites about circle casting and such and NONE of them mention closing the circle. Not one single site in over 10 so far talks about ending the ritual by closing the circle. How incomplete of them. I’m surprised yet not astounded.

Still, makes me wonder how many people ignore this part of the ritual then? How many circles are cast but never closed. How much energy is spilled out into the universe due to sloppy rituals? If you build it you must close it too.